JW Reading - Daily portion


This week's reading is LUKE 2-3.

Today's portion goes from 2:19 to 2:36.


19 but Mary began to preserve all these sayings, drawing conclusions in her heart. 20 Then the shepherds went back, glorifying and praising God for all they had heard and seen, just as it had been told to them. 21 After eight days, when it was time to circumcise him, he was named Jesus, the name given by the angel before he was conceived. 22 Also, when the time came for purifying them according to the Law of Moses, they brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to Jehovah, just as it is written in Jehovah’s Law: “Every firstborn male23  must be called holy to Jehovah. ” 24 And they offered a sacrifice according to what is said in the Law of Jehovah: “a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons. ” And look! there was a man in Jerusalem named Simʹe·on, and this man was righteous and devout, waiting for Israel’s consolation, 25  and holy spirit was upon him. 26 Furthermore, it had been divinely revealed to him by the holy spirit that he would not see death before he had seen the Christ of Jehovah. Under the power of the spirit, he now came into the temple, and as the parents brought the young child Jesus in to do for him according to the customary practice of the Law, 27  he took the child into his arms and praised God and said: 28 29 “Now, Sovereign Lord, you are letting your slave go in peace according to your declaration, 30 because my eyes have seen your means of salvation 31 that you have prepared in the sight of all the peoples, a light32  for removing the veil from the nations and a glory of your people Israel. ” And the child’s father and mother continued wondering at the things being spoken about him. 33 34 Also, Simʹe·on blessed them and said to Mary, the child’s mother: “Look! This child is appointed for the falling and the rising again of many in Israel and for a sign to be spoken against 35 (yes, a long sword will be run through you), in order that the reasonings of many hearts may be revealed. ” Now there was a prophetess, Anna the daughter of Phanʹu·el, of Ashʹer’s tribe. This woman was well along in years and had lived with her husband for seven years after they were married, 36 

/////////// Publications researches ///////////


2:19
ia 158 :

16. How did Mary show that she truly was thoughtful, revealing what key to her faith?

16 Mary was surely exhausted from the rigors of childbirth, yet she listened intently to every word. And she did more: “Mary began to preserve all these sayings, drawing conclusions in her heart. ” (Luke 2:19) This young woman truly was thoughtful. She knew that this angelic message was vital. Her God, Jehovah, wanted her to know and to appreciate her son’s identity and importance. So she did more than listen. She stored away the words in her heart so that she could ponder over them again and again in the months and years to come. Here is an outstanding key to the faith that Mary showed throughout her life. ​—Read Hebrews 11:1.

In the stable,  Mary holds baby Jesus while she and Joseph listen to the shepherds

Mary listened carefully to the shepherds and preserved their words in her heart

17. How can we follow Mary’s example when it comes to spiritual truths?

17 Will you follow Mary’s example? Jehovah has filled the pages of his Word with vital spiritual truths. However, those truths can do us little good unless we first pay attention to them. We do that by reading the Bible regularly​—not merely as a work of literature but as the inspired Word of God. (2 Tim. 3:16) Then, like Mary, we need to store up spiritual sayings in our heart, drawing conclusions. If we meditate on what we read in the Bible, contemplating ways that we can apply Jehovah’s counsel more fully, we will give our faith the nourishment it needs to grow.


w09 1/1 4-5 :

Later some shepherds arrived, eager to see the baby. They reported that angels had called this child “a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. ” Then we read: “Mary began to preserve all these sayings, drawing conclusions in her heart. ” She meditated on these words and drew strength from them. ​—Luke 2:11, 16-19.

What about us? We are likely to suffer pain in life. Furthermore, the Bible shows that “time and unforeseen occurrence” can befall any of us, throwing all manner of hardships and challenges in our path. (Ecclesiastes 9:11) If that happens, do we turn bitter, blaming God? Would it not be better to imitate Mary’s attitude and draw closer to Jehovah God by learning from his Word, the Bible, and then meditating on what we have learned? Doing so will surely help us to endure trials.


w08 10/1 24-25 :

Mary was surely exhausted from the rigors of childbirth, yet she listened intently to every word. And she did more: “Mary began to preserve all these sayings, drawing conclusions in her heart. ” (Luke 2:19) This young woman truly was a thinker. She knew that this angelic message was vital. Her God, Jehovah, wanted her to know and to appreciate her son’s identity and importance. So she did more than listen. She stored away the words in her heart so that she could ponder over them again and again in the months and years to come. Here is an outstanding key to the faith that Mary showed throughout her life.

Will you follow Mary’s example? Jehovah has filled the pages of his Word with vital spiritual truths. However, those truths can do us little good unless we first pay attention to them. We do that by reading the Bible regularly​—not merely as a work of literature but as the inspired Word of God. (2 Timothy 3:16) Then, like Mary, we need to store up spiritual sayings in our heart, drawing conclusions. If we meditate on what we read in the Bible, contemplating ways in which we can apply Jehovah’s counsel more fully, we will give our faith the nourishment it needs to grow.


w03 12/15 7 :

As Jesus grew up, Mary kept a mental note of what took place in his life, “drawing conclusions in her heart. ” (Luke 2:19,  51) Like Joseph, she was a spiritual person and treasured up the events and sayings that fulfilled prophecies. What the angel Gabriel said to her must have stuck in her mind: “This one will be great and will be called Son of the Most High; and Jehovah God will give him the throne of David his father, and he will rule as king over the house of Jacob forever, and there will be no end of his kingdom. ” (Luke 1:32,  33) Yes, she took seriously the privilege of being the human mother of the Messiah.


2:21

Jesus: See study note on Mt 1:21 :

21 She will give birth to a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins. ”


2:22

the time .  .  . for purifying them: That is, the time for them to be ceremonially cleansed for worship. The Mosaic Law required that a mother undergo purification for 40 days after giving birth to a male. (Le 12:1-4 :
Ro 5:12 :
Lu 1:34, 35 :

Jehovah: Existing Greek manuscripts use the word Kyʹri·os (Lord) here, but there are good reasons for using the divine name in the main text. As the following verse shows, Jesus’ being brought to the temple after his birth is in accord with Jehovah’s words to Moses at Ex 13:1, 2 :
12 :
to present him to Jehovah is similar to what is described at
1Sa 1:22-28 :
Lu 2:22 :
study notes on Lu 1:6 :

They both were righteous before God, walking blamelessly in accord with all the commandments and legal requirements of Jehovah.


2:23 :

23 just as it is written in Jehovah’s Law: “Every firstborn male must be called holy to Jehovah. ”


2:23

Jehovah’s Law: Although existing Greek manuscripts read noʹmo Ky·riʹou, “Lord’s Law, ” there are good reasons for using the divine name in the main text. This expression occurs many times in the Hebrew Scriptures as a combination of the Hebrew word for “law” and the Tetragrammaton. (For example: Ex 13:9 :
2Ki 10:31 :
1Ch 16:40 :
22:12 :
2Ch 17:9 :
31:3 :
Ne 9:3 :
Ps 1:2 :
119:1 :
Isa 5:24 :
Jer 8:8 :
Am 2:4 :
just as it is written is a common introduction to Hebrew Scripture quotes in the Christian Greek Scriptures. (
Mr 1:2 :
Ac 7:42 :
15:15 :
Ro 1:17 :
10:15 :
Septuagint at
2Ki 14:6 :
2Ch 31:3 :
35:26 :
Kyʹri·os where it would be expected according to standard grammatical usage, making Kyʹri·os tantamount to a proper name in this context. In view of the context, the Hebrew Scripture background, and the absence of the Greek definite article, there are good reasons to use the divine name in the main text of
Lu 2:23 :
study note on Lu 1:6 :

They both were righteous before God, walking blamelessly in accord with all the commandments and legal requirements of Jehovah.


App. C :

Jehovah: This quote is based on Ex 13:2 :


2:24

they offered a sacrifice: Under the Mosaic Law, a woman remained ceremonially unclean for a set length of time after giving birth. Once the time had elapsed, a burnt offering and a sin offering were made for her. —Le 12:1-8 :

the Law of Jehovah: See study note on Lu 2:23 :

23 just as it is written in Jehovah’s Law: “Every firstborn male must be called holy to Jehovah. ”


a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons: The Law allowed for women of little means to offer birds instead of a sheep, which would have been far costlier. (Le 12:6 :
8 :
Mt 2:9-11 :


2:25

Simeon: This name comes from a Hebrew verb meaning “to hear; to listen. ” Like Zechariah and Elizabeth, Simeon is described as righteous. (Lu 1:5,  6 :
devout, a rendering of the Greek word eu·la·besʹ, which is used in the Christian Greek Scriptures to denote being careful and conscientious in matters of worship. —
Ac 2:5 :
8:2 :
22:12 :


2:26

the Christ: Or “the Anointed One; the Messiah. ” The title “Christ” is derived from the Greek word Khri·stosʹ and is equivalent to the title “Messiah” (from Hebrew Ma·shiʹach), both meaning “Anointed One. ”—See study note on Mt 1:1 :

1 The book of the history of Jesus Christ, son of David, son of Abraham:


the Christ of Jehovah in this verse.

the Christ of Jehovah: There are good reasons for using the divine name in the main text, although available Greek manuscripts literally read “the Christ of Lord” (ton khri·stonʹ Ky·riʹou). In existing copies of the Septuagint, this expression corresponds to the Hebrew term ma·shiʹach YHWH, that is, “anointed (one) of Jehovah, ” used 11 times in the Hebrew Scriptures. (1Sa 24:6 :
10 :
26:9 :
11 :
16 :
23 :
2Sa 1:14 :
16 :
19:21 :
La 4:20 :


2:27
w94 3/15 24-25 :

One day (in 2 B. C. E. ), a young couple with a baby come to the temple from Bethlehem. Holy spirit reveals to Simeon that this is the long-awaited day. He goes to the temple, where he will see the One of whom the prophets have written. Hurrying as fast as his aged frame permits, he sees Joseph, Mary, and the child.


2:28
w94 3/15 24-25 :

With what joy Simeon takes the child Jesus into his arms! This One will be the promised Messiah​—“the Christ of Jehovah. ” At such an advanced age, Simeon cannot hope to watch Jesus fulfill His earthly mission. Yet, it is wonderful to see him as a babe. Messianic prophecies are beginning to be fulfilled.


2:29

Sovereign Lord: The Greek word de·spoʹtes has the basic meaning “lord; master; owner. ” (1Ti 6:1 :
Tit 2:9 :
1Pe 2:18 :
Ac 4:24 :
Re 6:10 :
ʼAdho·naiʹ (Sovereign Lord), but at least two such translations (referred to as J9, 18 in
App. C :

letting your slave go: The Greek word for “to let go” literally means “to set free; to release; to dismiss. ” Here it is used as a euphemism for “to let die. ” For a person to die in peace could mean his dying a tranquil death after having enjoyed a full life or after the realization of a cherished hope. (Compare Ge 15:15 :
1Ki 2:6 :


2:30
w77 28 :

Jehovah God took note of Simeon’s outstanding faith and favored him with a special revelation. By means of his spirit, the Most High made known to him that he would not die before actually seeing the Christ. (Luke 2:26) What a thrilling prospect!

One day, under the impelling power of God’s spirit, Simeon came into the temple area. It just so happened that a poor married couple, with an infant, also arrived. From outward appearance, the man, his wife and the baby boy were nothing special. The situation seemed quite ordinary, for a Jewish mother was required by law to offer sacrifice at the conclusion of a forty-day purification period after the birth of a male. ​—Luke 2:27.

In actuality, though, something remarkable had taken place, something that Simeon viewed as ample reward for his faith. The full significance of this was made manifest to him through holy spirit. The infant was none other than the one who was destined to be the Messiah, the Christ. With joy Simeon accepted the babe into his arms and, compelled by God’s spirit, said: “Now, Sovereign Lord, you are letting your slave go free in peace according to your declaration; because my eyes have seen your means of saving that you have made ready in the sight of all the peoples, a light for removing the veil from the nations and a glory of your people Israel. ”​—Luke 2:29-32.

By reason of the privilege extended to him, Simeon felt an inward peace or tranquillity. He now knew for a certainty that God’s marvelous means of salvation had been provided. He had seen the child with his own eyes and felt it with his own hands.


w71 58 :

Especially did names given at divine direction have prophetic meaning. For example, in the case of the Son of God, the name “Jesus” means “Jehovah is salvation” and was prophetic of his role as Savior or Jehovah’s means of salvation. ​—Matt. 1:21; Luke 2:30.


w66 255 :

Each married man went off to his family, said a tearful good-bye to his wife and children and then killed them. Ten men picked by lot proceeded to slaughter the rest and were, in turn, killed until just one man remained. After setting fire to the fortress, he ran himself through with his sword, climaxing the disaster of Masada.

The Romans returned in the morning expecting to face a stiff fight, but they found alive only two women and five children who had hid in a cave and thus survived to describe the suicidal massacre of 960 men, women and children. The disastrous history of Masada tragically underscores the truthfulness of Jesus’ words about the “days for meting out justice” that were to come upon the Jews who refused to heed his prophetic warning.


2:31
w77 28 :

Jehovah God took note of Simeon’s outstanding faith and favored him with a special revelation. By means of his spirit, the Most High made known to him that he would not die before actually seeing the Christ. (Luke 2:26) What a thrilling prospect!

One day, under the impelling power of God’s spirit, Simeon came into the temple area. It just so happened that a poor married couple, with an infant, also arrived. From outward appearance, the man, his wife and the baby boy were nothing special. The situation seemed quite ordinary, for a Jewish mother was required by law to offer sacrifice at the conclusion of a forty-day purification period after the birth of a male. ​—Luke 2:27.

In actuality, though, something remarkable had taken place, something that Simeon viewed as ample reward for his faith. The full significance of this was made manifest to him through holy spirit. The infant was none other than the one who was destined to be the Messiah, the Christ. With joy Simeon accepted the babe into his arms and, compelled by God’s spirit, said: “Now, Sovereign Lord, you are letting your slave go free in peace according to your declaration; because my eyes have seen your means of saving that you have made ready in the sight of all the peoples, a light for removing the veil from the nations and a glory of your people Israel. ”​—Luke 2:29-32.

By reason of the privilege extended to him, Simeon felt an inward peace or tranquillity. He now knew for a certainty that God’s marvelous means of salvation had been provided. He had seen the child with his own eyes and felt it with his own hands.


2:32

for removing the veil from the nations: Or “for revelation to the nations. ” The Greek term a·po·kaʹly·psis, rendered “removing the veil, ” denotes “an uncovering” or “a disclosure” and is often used regarding revelations of spiritual matters or of God’s will and purposes. (Ro 16:25 :
Eph 3:3 :
Re 1:1 :
a light, and he indicated that spiritual enlightenment was also to benefit the non-Jewish nations, not just the natural Jews and proselytes. Simeon’s prophetic words were in agreement with prophecies in the Hebrew Scriptures, such as those recorded at
Isa 42:6 :
49:6 :


2:34

the rising again: The Greek word a·naʹsta·sis used here is usually rendered “resurrection” in the Christian Greek Scriptures. (See study note on Mt 22:23 :

23 On that day the Sadducees, who say there is no resurrection, came and asked him:


Lu 2:35 :
a sign to be spoken against, or an object of contempt. Such faithless ones would reject him, stumble over him, and fall. As foretold, Jesus proved to be a stone of stumbling to many Jews. (Isa 8:14 :
Isa 28:16 :
Eph 2:1 :

2:35

a long sword: Since there is no Scriptural indication that Mary had an actual sword run through her, this expression evidently refers to the pain, suffering, and sorrow that Mary would undergo in connection with her son’s death on a torture stake. —Joh 19:25 :

you: Or “your own soul; your life. ”—See Glossary, “Soul :

Soul

The traditional rendering of the Hebrew word neʹphesh and the Greek word psy·kheʹ. In examining the way these terms are used in the Bible, it becomes evident that they basically refer to (1) people, (2) animals, or (3) the life that a person or an animal has. (Ge 1:20; 2:7; Nu 31:28; 1Pe 3:20; also ftns. ) In contrast to the way that the term “soul” is used in many religious contexts, the Bible shows that both neʹphesh and psy·kheʹ, in connection with earthly creatures, refer to that which is material, tangible, visible, and mortal. In this translation, these original-language words have most often been rendered according to their meaning in each context, using such terms as “life, ” “creature, ” “person, ” “one’s whole being, ” or simply as a personal pronoun (for example, “I” for “my soul”). In most cases, footnotes give the alternative rendering “soul. ” When the term “soul” is used, either in the main text or in footnotes, it should be understood in line with the above explanation. When referring to doing something with one’s whole soul, it means to do it with one’s whole being, wholeheartedly, or with one’s whole life. (De 6:5; Mt 22:37) In some contexts, these original-language words can be used to refer to the desire or appetite of a living creature. They can also refer to a dead person or a dead body. ​—Nu 6:6; Pr 23:2; Isa 56:11; Hag 2:13.





Link to my account

JW Reading - 2018